Qutub Minar – Delhi’s Most Towering Attraction!

By Mark Wiens 6 Comments
The majestic Qutub Minar!
The majestic Qutub Minar!

One of the top things to do in Delhi is visit Qutub Minar.

Along with many ruins and structures, the site is especially recognized for its distinct minar which measures 72.5 meters in height.

Entrance fee to Qutub Minar is 250 Rupees
Entrance fee to Qutub Minar is 250 Rupees

Entrance to Qutub Minar for foreigners is 250 Rupees, which is quite expensive largely because it’s a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Make sure you count your change when you pay for your ticket.

Just like at the Taj Mahal, this is one of the numerous places in India where I paid with a large bill and was shorthanded change.

Luckily at Qutub Minar I immediately counted my change, realized the ticket vendor had given me a few hundred Rupees short and went back to the counter where he handed over the correct change.

Make sure you count your change!

Overview of Qutub Minar in Delhi, India
Overview of Qutub Minar in Delhi, India

Built in the late 1100’s, Qutub Minar is an ancient complex that has numerous layers of history. The structure is mostly constructed of red sandstone and many of the walls are covered in verses from the Qur’an.

Throughout its many years of existence, the minar has been struck by lightning a few times, and built upon a number of times as well.

Before walking all the way up to the minaret, I decided to walk into the garden and get an overall perspective.

Intricate detail on a wall
Intricate detail on a wall

The walls of Qutub Minar surrounding the minar were covered in intricate stone carvings, a true masterpiece of Mughal Islamic craftsmanship.

The fine details, the sky reaching tower, and the ancientness of the complex make Qutub Minar an incredible attraction.

Peeking at Qutub Minar from an archway
Peeking at Qutub Minar from an archway

The minar was used as a watch tower, and I’m sure the view from the top is amazing. Too bad they don’t allow anyone to go inside the minar anymore.

I was quite happy to view it from the ground. Like in all of Delhi (video), I was amazed at the amount of birds which filled the air, flying from pillar to pillar in huge flocks and chirping along the way. It really set the mood for a historical attraction like Qutub Minar.

Sandstone carvings
Sandstone carvings

Apart from the minar itself, some of the other ruins around Qutub Minar are not extremely well preserved. Some of the carvings looked like they had been repaired. Thankfully that didn’t take away from the original beauty of the complex.

A popular spot for a photo
A popular spot for a photo

On one of the corners there’s a structure that houses a number of tombs, and it happens to be a popular spot where many local Indian’s were taking photos.

The carvings in this area looked to be original and very well preserved.

Posing for a photo
Posing for a photo

Qutub Minar, while attracting plenty of foreign tourists, is also a huge attractions for local Indians. Perhaps because I went on the weekend, there were plenty of families out for a day of sightseeing and lots of school groups as well.

These guys were extremely happy to have their photo taken!

Qutub Minar!
Qutub Minar!

Qutub Minar is located in South Delhi, and it’s easiest to get there by taking the Delhi Metro to Qutub Minar station. Unfortunately the station is not right next to the monument, so it’s best to hop in an auto rickshaw for a quick ride to the entrance gate.

Open hours: 10 am – 6 pm daily
Address: Mehrauli, New Delhi, Delhi 110030, India
Price: 250 Rupees, but make sure you count your change, I was shorthanded, and had to return for my correct change!

For more info and tips check out my Delhi travel guide!

6 comments. I'd love to hear from you!

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  • Noel

    8 years ago

    A magnificent ancient masterpiece. Love to see it in my future trips. Thanks for the info.

  • Shalu Sharma

    8 years ago

    This place is very nice, have visited many times. Unfortunately the tower was built to commemorate the defeat of Hindu rulers in India but still part of history and mediaeval India.

  • Anwesha

    8 years ago

    Hey Mark, Qutub was actually build using bricks from over twenty ( I believe 27) Hindu temples that Qutab-ud-din Aibak demolished. In many places at Qutub Minar, you can still see the figurines typical to Hindu temples.
    Also, you are right about the birds. Catching a bright green parakeet against the re sandstone of Qutub Minar make for such excellent photography.
    Loved your article and pictures.

    • Mark Wiens

      8 years ago

      Wow, thanks for sharing that extra piece of information – Qutub Minar was surely my favorite historical site in Delhi!

  • Maria

    8 years ago

    The far shots are gorgeous but your closeups are where it’s at – such intricate detail. You must have found it difficult to leave.